Read and write binary file in vbscript recalll


The reason is that the binary type will only accept a true binary array. This is a special data structure used for manipulating binary files that is not available in VBScript.

Once the stream is opened, we begin writing the binary characters to the stream as you saw earlier. Characters are written one after another as if we were writing to a standard text stream object. All is well and good. The stream can be saved to a file and then closed. However, if you try to open the newly-created zip file, Windows will politely inform you that the file is corrupt.

When you examine the newly-created file in your trusty hex editor, you will soon see why. The ADO Stream object inserts two unwanted characters at the beginning of the file before we begin writing our characters.

Since the ADO Stream object is the only thing we have available capable of reading binary input, we have to go back to it to fix the problem. This time we open a new stream but we open it in binary mode. Reading a stream in binary mode will read the file contents into a true binary array. At least we have the binary data to work with.

The ADO Stream now contains the binary contents of our zip file. This piece of code is where the magic happens. The stream object is kind of similar to a recordset. We can read it one character at a type from beginning to end, and a marker keeps track of where we are. So by manually setting that marker position to 2, we can avoid reading the two unwanted characters at the beginning of our binary stream.

Once the binary data has been read, we can set the cursor position back to 0, or the beginning of the stream. This effectively empties the contents of the stream object. Now we can write the cleaned-up binary back to the file. Stream method of creating binary files for quite some time before stumbling across this method. The FileSystemObject is not designed to work with binary files.

OpenTextFile strPath, 2, True. The secret is in the use of the OpenTextFile method. When the FileSystemObject creates a file, it creates a completely empty file.

We can write our binary data directly to it without any problems. We just need to determine how to do that. This is a special data structure used for manipulating binary files that is not available in VBScript. Once the stream is opened, we begin writing the binary characters to the stream as you saw earlier. Characters are written one after another as if we were writing to a standard text stream object. All is well and good. The stream can be saved to a file and then closed. However, if you try to open the newly-created zip file, Windows will politely inform you that the file is corrupt.

When you examine the newly-created file in your trusty hex editor, you will soon see why. The ADO Stream object inserts two unwanted characters at the beginning of the file before we begin writing our characters. Since the ADO Stream object is the only thing we have available capable of reading binary input, we have to go back to it to fix the problem. This time we open a new stream but we open it in binary mode. Reading a stream in binary mode will read the file contents into a true binary array.

At least we have the binary data to work with. The ADO Stream now contains the binary contents of our zip file. This piece of code is where the magic happens. The stream object is kind of similar to a recordset. We can read it one character at a type from beginning to end, and a marker keeps track of where we are. So by manually setting that marker position to 2, we can avoid reading the two unwanted characters at the beginning of our binary stream.

Once the binary data has been read, we can set the cursor position back to 0, or the beginning of the stream. This effectively empties the contents of the stream object. Now we can write the cleaned-up binary back to the file. Stream method of creating binary files for quite some time before stumbling across this method.

The FileSystemObject is not designed to work with binary files. OpenTextFile strPath, 2, True. The secret is in the use of the OpenTextFile method. When the FileSystemObject creates a file, it creates a completely empty file.

We can write our binary data directly to it without any problems. We just need to determine how to do that. I move through the string, grabbing those characters two at a time.